The Setanta car crash: what about injured parties?

The collapse of Setanta Insurance is not just a shambles for policyholders. They, at least, could arrange new insurance and at worst lost only the unexpired value of their policy. But what about someone injured in a road traffic accident cause by a Setanta policyholder?

The situation remains murky. Information available from the Central Bank and other sources initially referred to the Irish Insurance Compensation Fund. Calling on the ICF for all claims involving Setanta would put further pressure on the Fund but also be significantly unfair to injured parties, as it only pays out 65% of a claim or €825,000 (whichever is lower). For example: a claimant for €1.5 million would only get €825,000 from the ICF; a claimant for €100,000 would only get €65,000.

In the aftermath of the news solicitors obviously reviewed their personal injury files for claims against Setanta and, in the case of such claims, look for another source of cover. The prospect of involving the Motor Insurers’ Bureau of Ireland immediately arose. The gut response is that MIBI was set up to cover claims against uninsured or untraced drivers, whereas the ICF was set up to cover insolvent insurers. Surely a claim against Setanta “belongs” with the ICF?

The MIBI agreement is poorly worded at the best of times but in this situation perhaps for the better. The agreement says that if an award which should be covered by an approved policy of insurance is not paid in full within 28 days then, whether or not insurance actually was in place, MIBI will pay it. This interpretation is supported by guidance from Insurance Ireland, the industry body, which says that awards not honoured by Setanta should be referred to MIBI who would pay out and seek to recoup funds in Malta, where Setanta is regulated.

On 1 May 2014, the Minister for Finance stated in the Dáil that

The Motor Insurance Bureau of Ireland [sic] (“MIBI”) have indicated that they intend to accept all third party claims in connection to Setanta policies.

The minister responsible for the agreement with MIBI is the Minister for Transport. The Department of Transport has not had much to say about Setanta to date but the Minister for Transport was asked in the Dáil on 8 May 2014 how MIBI would handle Setanta claims. He responded:

The arrangement MIBI puts in place for dealing with the Setanta claims is a matter for the MIBI itself under the terms of the Agreement. I will arrange for the Deputy’s question to be forwarded to the MIBI for them to respond directly to her.

This does not go so far as confirming that MIBI will, in fact, be covering Setanta claims. The question asked of him is important because when a claim arises from an uninsured driver MIBI is sued alongside the defendant (or as the sole defendant if the driver is untraced), whereas the obligation to pay out on foot of an award which has not been honoured by an insurance company is different. There are likely to be a number of cases where a claimant has already sued the other driver but might now be statute barred as against MIBI, if required to join them. However, in that situation one would assume that MIBI should not necessarily be sued as a co-defendant. But the Law Society advises that claims against Setanta be notified to MIBI in the same manner as uninsured/untraced driver cases. This would involve MIBI being sued alongside the driver.

The Irish Brokers Association got a legal opinion on the situation but really it goes no further than to summarise the ICF and MIBI regimes and state that “recent Dáil comments indicate the MIBI scheme may be available in the context of Setanta.”

What has been the response of MIBI to such notifications? I received my first this morning.

Paul Merceica has recently been appointed as liquidator of [Setanta Insurance] and will be responsible for the administration of the Company’s assets and liabilities … You may also wish to refer to the website of the Malta Financial Services Authority for further information …

This is an update about the liquidation of Setanta Insurance, not about how MIBI will deal with Setanta claims made against it. [As an aside: good luck trying to get a substantive response from the Setanta contact centre.] The only relevant response was as follows:

At this point we cannot confirm our position.

Accordingly, how can it be said with certainty that MIBI will voluntarily meet Setanta third party claims? And who is in charge?

In relation to the wider problem with Setanta, David Murphy has a great post on the RTÉ Business blog which highlights a significant fact:

The Central Bank became aware that there were problems in Setanta late last year, it was still permitted to sell insurance policies until it the end of 2013 and went bust last month.

While a customer of Setanta with the foresight to see the writing on the wall had the option of switching cover before the appointment of a liquidator and getting a refund of part of their policy, someone with a claim against Setanta had whether or not they got their money out largely depend on lucky timing.

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